With the high quality of the meetings and conferences we attended at the 2018 Sports Acupuncture Alliance Summit, I could not miss the 2019 edition of this gathering of passionate acupuncturists specialized in sports acupuncture. Especially when I learned that Clayton Shiu was one of the speakers.

Clayton Shiu is a New York acupuncturist who received a special grant from the Chinese Government to study at the Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (from where he obtained his PhD) under the supervision of the famous Dr. Shi Xue Min, a pioneer in the treatment of stroke. He is now one of North America’s leading specialists in the treatment of concussions and other neurological problems.

My interest in treating concussions and traumatic brain injury with acupuncture was awakened last year by Amy Moll. Dr. Moll conducted a research on the effects of acupuncture on cerebral circulation in mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters after a concussion. At the 2018 Summit, she detailed the mechanisms of brain trauma, neurological assessment, and how acupuncture can help recovery.

Concussions are much more common than expected and their impact may persist long after the incident. For those who suffer from post-concussion syndrome, treatment options are limited. But acupuncture is an option that can be effective and play an important role in the remission of patients.

The other conferences of this long weekend were given by Derrik McBride and Arya Nielson. For a whole day, Derrick McBride taught us how to evaluate movement and how to distinguish between mobility and motor control restrictions in our musculoskeletal clientele. Many examples and practice allow us to use these new learning as soon as we return to the clinic.

Arya Nielson is a well-known name in the world of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. She has contributed to numerous studies (and continues to do research) and has been very politically involved in the promotion and regulation of acupuncture. Among other things, she is known for the book she wrote and the training she gives on guasha. She spoke to us about the role that acupuncture can (and should) play in the treatment of pain, particularly in the context of the opioid crisis that is affecting not only the United States, but Canada as well.

The Sports Acupuncture Alliance 2019 Summit was a very rewarding weekend that I come back loaded with enthusiasm and new knowledge and clinical skills that I look forward to putting at your service.

To make an appointment or to find out more about what acupuncture can do for you and your loved ones, contact us.